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AUT Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences
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24 Feb 2020 104 Respondents
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+30XPRespond to CaseBoard
By Amanda Lees
Mega Mind (40766 XP)
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OPTIONAL WEEK 4 CASE: BMI NURSE- SHALL WE LET HER IN?

OPTIONAL WEEK 4 CASE: BMI NURSE- SHALL WE LET HER IN?

We've already been introduced to the nurse wanting entry into NZ when we considered the theories of utilitarianism and deontology as part of out Week 3 theoretical exploration.

To cement your understanding of theory but also to gain more confidence using the Vx, let's consider the case again- in greater depth:

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The most common method for measuring obesity rates, for population groups, is classifying by an index called the body mass index (BMI).

Body mass index (BMI) is defined as weight kg/height m2.

Adults with a BMI of 25.0–29.9 are considered overweight, and those with a BMI of 30 or greater are considered obese.

Obesity is a risk factor for many chronic disease including type 2 diabetes, heart disease, hypertension and stroke, gallstones and some cancers.

Nutrition-related factors including obesity are major risk factors for causes of death in New Zealand. The effect of increased body mass index (BMI) was estimated to be responsible for 11.5 percent of all deaths in 1997.

The NZ Immigration Service currently uses BMI as one of its criteria for entry to NZ.Is this justified?

What do you think?

Read More
www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10476475

It is proposed that the Immigration Service continue using BMI as an entry criterion

Key Concepts

Agreement
Disagreement

Gender

Agreement
Disagreement